Mon. Nov 30th, 2020

Isle of Wight Observer News

The Island's Free Newspaper

Can you help Island historians identify these mystery locations?

2 min read
The six images form part of a collection of more than 600 glass plate negatives taken by Sandown photographer, James Dore

Can you identify any of the locations in these photographs? If so, then the Isle of Wight Heritage Service would like to hear from you.

The six images form part of a collection of more than 600 glass plate negatives taken by Sandown photographer, James Dore (1854-1925), that provide a vivid record of Island life at the turn of the 20th century.

While many of the places featured in Dore’s work are known, the locations in these six photographs remain a mystery.

Richard Smout, Isle of Wight Heritage service manager, said: “It is possible that one or more of these pictures was not taken on the Isle of Wight.

“However, there may be a few clues in some of the photographs, and in all cases it is worth remembering that Dore was Sandown-based.

“He took pictures across the Island but there is likely to be an emphasis on communities in the south-east corner.”

Photo one – (ref:1292) Presence of a band as well as of soldiers may imply that there is a barracks somewhere in the vicinity. Fields on the left, clumps of cottages on the right. Larger buildings at the top of the hill.
Photo two – (ref:12290) Background blurred but buildings are tall and distinctive. Event is taking place on wide-open grassed area, possibly in a flood plain.
Photo 3 – (ref:12291) Substantial thatched cottage angled to the road, with lean-to at the road end of the building. Appears to be on a bend.
Photo 4 – (Ref:12293) Building materials and the steepness of the road seem to point to this being on the Undercliff. Hard to tell if the road is on a hairpin bend or whether the lower road is a lane or private drive.
Photo five – (Ref:12322) Fine farmhouse with steep-pitched roof. There are a number of examples on the Isle of Wight. Impressive stone wall.
Photo six – (Ref:12346) If this is in Isle of Wight it is clearly in an area that floods regularly. Note the raised walkway, which may be a platform for a railway halt. Number of pine trees may also offer a clue.

If you can help identify the locations, please contact the Isle of Wight Heritage Service at museums@iow.gov.uk