Mon. May 16th, 2022

Isle of Wight Observer News

The Island's Free Newspaper

A LOOK BACK IN TIME: County petty sessions

2 min read

The Isle of Wight Observer of March, 13th 1869 tells tales of stolen swedes and news that Yarmouth Castle (used in a defensive role until 1855) had been condemned.

 

COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS

John Langford was brought up on remand charged with stealing 16 bushels of Swede turnips, the property of Mr. R. Mew. – Mr Beckingsale defended the prisoner. – P.C. Tarrant, cross-examined, said that he went after John Tribbett, of Wootton, and found him in the White Lion publichouse, at Newport, and while talking to him the prisoner came up. Witness said to the latter: “Is this the man you bought the Swedes from?” to which he said yes, but Tribbett said he never sold him any in his life. Langford still insisted that Tribbett had sold him some turnips on Wednesday week; while the other was as positive in denying that he had done so. Since then witness had endeavored to serve a summons upon Tribbett, but could not, as he kept out of the way. – William Carter, laborer, said he knew Longford, and on Friday fortnight, at 7.30 p.m., he was coming from Cowes, and as he came towards prisoner’s house he saw Tribbett carry a bag from a cart into the house. Witness went into the house, and noticed prisoner put some money on the table, and ask Tribbett, “Is that right?” and he said yes, and took the money up and left. Witness bought a fish of Langford. On coming out he saw the horse and cart still standing before the door, but no person was there. – The Chairman told prisoner that he was discharged for the present.

YARMOUTH

Sign of Peaceable Times. – For some days past the men of the Royal Artillery have been employed in dismantling the large heavy 92-pounder guns from the top of our old Castle, which, we are informed, is condemned, and like many of our newly-constructed forts is found to be of no use whatever. Rumour says the Government have resolved to dispose of the old Castle – which is said to have been built in the time of Henry VIII. – by public auction, as it now stands, but we think it would be far more desirable and beneficial if the authorities were to hand it over to the town as a present, to enable the enlargement of the town quay for the convenience and better accommodation of the public who frequent the place.